You may never know what results come of your action, but if you do nothing there will be no result.” — Gandhi

We are fast approaching Christmas and this is always a sign that we have once again reached the end of another calendar year. I always find the end of the year to be a time of reflection and review. It is also a time to evaluate the progress of your life purpose, goals and objectives that were set at the start of the year or the longer term goals set in previous years. Your life purpose, goals and objectives should be part of your Personal Development Plan.

The end of the year also offers a fresh start for activities that we had intended to do but never got around to doing them. Although I had previously stated that any day can be the start of the rest of your life, the end of the year can be a special time because it can provide closure to outstanding action items that may no longer be relevant, but also removing limiting beliefs by leaving them behind in the current year. The dawning of a new year provides the incentive to start a fresh action list and the motivation to get things done.

Many people make New Year’s resolutions, however, they quickly discover that the resolutions fade even before the first quarter of the calendar year is reached. It is not just about making New Year’s resolutions at the dawn of the New Year, it is about making a committed effort to set written goals and objectives for the coming year and for the medium to longer term timeframe. Numerous studies have shown only three percent of the population set goals and only about one percent actually write them down.

I challenge you to make a committed effort, that is, take ACTION, to review your previous goals and objectives, and/or to set new goals and objectives for 2012. Begin by identifying the major achievements and highlights for 2011. These could include work achievements, financial objectives, family highlights, personal development, educational achievements or personal success outcomes. Achievements should also be acknowledged and celebrated to ensure mental reinforcement and capitalizing on the motivation that this can provide to your subconscious mind. I try to reward myself when I achieve a particular goal or objective. For example, I will buy a gift for myself that reminds me of the success that I have achieved, or I will organise a special holiday trip for myself and my family. In early December of 2011 I took the family to Hawaii for 17 days to celebrate a very successful 2011. In previous years I bought myself a Tag Heuer watch to remind me of a successful multi-million dollar deal I had closed in the year.

I use a visual journal with white pages to document my goals and objectives for the new calendar year. Once I complete this activity I then develop Action Plans for the major goals and objectives. Throughout the year I periodically review my goals and revise any action plans that are not progressing as expected. You should also prepare a vision board which consists of a portfolio of visual material or a collage of images that portray your vision, goals and objectives. The vision board helps to stimulate your reticular activating system in your mind to reaffirm your subconscious.

Like most people I also identify a few missed opportunities or disappointments for the year. This allows me to learn from the experience so that I can strengthen my future plans moving forward. Go ahead and document the missed opportunities and disappointments. Ask yourself, “What could I have done differently to capitalise on the missed opportunities or overcame the disappointments?”, and document potential changes and actions for the future. Don’t spend too much time regretting the missed opportunities. The rest of your life starts now, therefore focus on your future goals and plans for 2012. Some of these goals could also be carried over from 2011. Particularly goals that were over ambitious, which is common amongst high achievers.

I had also previously posted a number of blog entries that can provide further detailed information on developing your goals and objectives (see below). Furthermore, I have included a Personal Development Plan Template that may also be used as a guide.

What are your key goals, objectives and action plans for 2012?

Have a merry Christmas and I wish you every success for the New Year in 2012!

Dr John Kapeleris

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Having completed another decade of goals and objectives I decided to update my vision board for the new decade to capture my big audacious goals for the future. A vision board consists of a portfolio of visual material or a collage of images that portray your vision of the goals and objectives you wish to achieve. It is a representation of the future story of yourself.

The purpose of a vision board is to help stimulate your reticular activating system (RAS) in your mind to reaffirm your subconscious through the visual images on the board. By periodically viewing the vision board you reinforce your subconscious through your RAS. The RAS is part of your brain that filters out external information and focuses on those things that are important to you. We all have it. As an example, for a period of time after you purchase a new car your mind automatically notices the same car on the road.

When I was younger I remember cutting out pictures of items that I wanted to acquire, for example, a new motor vehicle, a holiday or new stereo system. I would stick these pictures next to my desk and then begin to save money as quickly as possible to be in a position to purchase the particular item. I would view the pictures when I sat at my desk daily, which would motivate me to focus on achieving my goals and objectives. Before I knew it I had purchased the item and I was enjoying the benefits. Before long I had another picture of something new that I wanted in my life. I would also raise the bar or standard of my aspirations with each picture I posted. This process is not that different to creating your personal vision board.

How to Create Your Own Vision Board

Creating a vision board is simple and it can be a lot of fun. If you have children or teenagers it’s great to introduce this concept to them at an early age as this will help to focus their future aspirations.

Step 1. If you haven’t already documented your goals and objectives this is the first thing you must do. Using your goals and objectives as a guide collect pictures, photos and power words that closely represent the outcomes of your goals and objectives. The pictures, photos and power words can be sourced from magazines, brochures or downloaded from the internet. The vision board theme should reflect the future story of yourself. As a guide you can consider the following areas of your life:

  1. What are your future dreams and aspirations that reflect the theme of your vision board?
  2. What work would you be doing?
  3. Where would you be living?
  4. What would your home look like?
  5. What would you be driving?
  6. What personal things would you have?
  7. Who would be part of your life?
  8. What activities are important to you?
  9. What are your personal development, health and wealth objectives?
  10. What are some of the intrinsic goals in your life?

Step 2. Purchase a large poster board consisting of thick card or foam-backed paper. Arrange the pictures that you have collected together with the key words to create visual representations that resonate with your dreams and aspirations.

Step 3. Once you have decided on the structure of your arrangement glue your pictures and words onto the poster. Some people prefer to design a collage of pictures while others prefer to space out and organise a defined group of images and labels. It is important to add the date you created your vision board and also the dates by which you want to achieve the visual goals that you have pasted on your poster.

Step 4. Strategically place the vision board in a location that allows you to view it every day. I have it placed on a wall in the room connected to the garage so that I can view it every time I leave the house in the morning. Some people like to view their vision boards just before they go to sleep and just as they wake up in the morning, as these times are best aligned with a relaxed state of your mind when your subconscious is best able to absorb the visual images.

Step 5. Periodically review and update your vision board. As you achieve some of the goals on your vision board you can update the board with fresh images that can continue to inspire and motivate you. You may also find that over time you have different goals and objectives depending on your situation, which will also need to be updated on your vision board.

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You can also use a computer based software that can create your vision board electronically, which can also be displayed as your screen saver. The best software for creating vision boards that I have found is Vision Board Studio.

I encourage you to create your vision board as soon as possible so that you can start using the underlying power of the tool to help you achieve your goals and objectives. Once you have developed your vision board the next step is to start living the goals and objectives. For example, if you have a dream car on your vision board go to the local dealer, get into the car, feel and smell the interior and go for a test drive. I have done this numerous times. I remember doing this with a watch some time ago. I made a commitment to myself that if I achieve my business goals in a particular financial year and receive my bonus I would purchase a watch that would commemorate the achievement. Periodically in that year I would visit the jewelery store and try on that watch. I would look at it and feel it on my arm. Every time I did this I would be even more motivated to achieving my business goals that would yield the watch as an outcome.

Dr John Kapeleris

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The start of the New Year is a signpost that always brings a feeling of a new awakening and subsequent change.  Many people will set New Year’s resolutions that will not be followed through. Others will continue doing the same old thing and getting the same result. A small percentage of people will set new written goals and objectives, and develop detailed action plans for their major projects, that will ultimately achieve their ambitions and success.

I came across the “10 Commandments of Goal Setting” on the GoalsGuy.com website that I thought may be of value to you:

  1. Thou Shall Be DecisiveSuccess is a choice. You must decide what you want, why you want it, and how you plan to achieve it. No one else can, will, or should do that for you.
  2. Thou Shall Stay Focused – A close relative to being decisive, but your ability to sustain your focus from beginning to end determines the timing and condition of your outcomes.
  3. Thou Shall Welcome Failure – The fundamental question is not whether you should accept failure. You have no choice but to expect it as a temporary condition on the pathway of progress. Rather, the question is how to anticipate failure and redirect resources to grow from the experience.
  4. Thou Shall Write Down Thou Goals – Your mind while blessed with permanent memory is cursed with lousy recall. People forget things. Avoid the temptation of being cute. Write down your goals.
  5. Thou Shall Plan ThoroughlyPlanning saves time and resources in execution. Proper planning prevents poor performance.
  6. Thou Shall Involve Others – Nobody goes through life alone. Establish your own “Personal Board of Directors“, people whose wisdom, knowledge and character you respect to help you achieve your goals.
  7. Thou Shall Take Massive Action – Success is not a spectator sport – achievement demands action. You cannot expect to arrive at success without having made the trip.
  8. Thou Shall Reward Thyself – Rewards work! Think of what you will give yourself as a result of your hard work, focus and persistence – you deserve it!
  9. Thou Shall Inspect What Thou Expect – The Shelf life of all plans is limited. No plan holds up against opposition. Everything changes. Therefore inspect and review frequently and closely, it’s an insurance policy on your success.
  10. Thou Shall Maintain Personal Integrity – Maintain your commitment to your promise. Set your goals, promise yourself that you will achieve them. Eliminate complacency and excuses. That’s personal integrity!

Start today, and set your goals and objectives that will influence the rest of your life!

Dr John Kapeleris

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“The purpose of man is in action, not thought.” — Thomas Carlyle

We are fast approaching Christmas and this is always a sign that we have once again reached the end of another calendar year. I always find the end of the year to be a time of reflection and review. It is also a time to evaluate the progress of your life purpose, goals and objectives that were set at the start of the year or the longer term goals set in previous years.

The end of the year also offers a fresh start for activities that we had intended to do but never got around to doing them. Although I had previously stated that any day can be the start of the rest of your life, the end of the year can be a special time because it can provide closure to outstanding action items that may no longer be relevant, but also removing limiting beliefs by leaving them behind in the current year. The dawning of a new year provides the incentive to start a fresh action list and the motivation to get things done.

Many people make New Year’s resolutions, however, they quickly discover that the resolutions fade even before the first quarter of the calender year is reached. It is not just about making New Year’s resolutions at the dawn of the New Year, it is about making a committed effort to set written goals and objectives for the coming year and for the medium to longer term timeframe.

I challenge you to make a committed effort, that is, take ACTION, to review your previous goals and objectives, and to set new goals and objectives for 2011. Begin by identifying the major achievements and highlights for 2010. These could include work achievements, financial objectives, family highlights, personal development, educational achievements or personal success outcomes. Achievements should also be acknowledged and celebrated to ensure mental reinforcement and capitalizing on the motivation that this can provide to your subconscious mind. I try to reward myself when I achieve a particular goal or objective. For example, I will buy a gift for myself that reminds me of the success that I have achieved, or I will organise a special holiday trip for myself and my family. Last January I decided to go to Byron Bay and live in a beach house for ten days to celebrate a very successful 2009. In previous years I bought myself a Tag Heuer watch to remind me of a successful multi-million dollar deal I had closed in the year.

I use a visual journal with white pages to document my goals and objectives for the new calendar year. Once I complete this activity I then develop Action Plans for the major goals and objectives. Throughout the year I periodically review my goals and revise any action plans that are not progressing as expected. You should also prepare a vision board which consists of a portfolio of visual material or a collage of images that portray your vision, goals and objectives. The vision board helps to stimulate your reticular activating system in your mind to reaffirm your subconscious.

Like most people I also identify a few missed opportunities or disappointments for the year. This allows me to learn from the experience so that I can strengthen my future plans moving forward. Go ahead and document the missed opportunities and disappointments. Ask yourself, “What could I have done differently to capitalise on the missed opportunities or overcame the disappointments?”, and document potential changes and actions for the future. Don’t spend too much time regretting the missed opportunities. The rest of your life starts now, therefore focus on your future goals and plans for 2011. Some of these goals could also be carried over from 2010. Particularly goals that were over ambitious, which is common amongst high achievers.

I had also previously posted a number of blog entries that can provide further detailed information on developing your goals and objectives (see below). Furthermore, I have included a Personal Development Plan Template that may also be used as a guide. A decent driveway paint site will get you the driveway paint you want.

What does your personal development plan look like?

Have a merry Christmas and I wish you every success for 2011!

Dr John Kapeleris

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We have now reached the middle of the calendar year which is a good time to review your major goals and objectives that were set at the start of the year, and determine progress along your personal development journey. I challenge you to allocate some time and action this important task. Your goals, objectives and personal action plan are not set in stone. Circumstances change and new opportunities emerge that you need to consider and build into your plan.

If you have maintained a journal to document your action plans for your major goals and objectives, and tracked your journey and progress, then this will be the first place to start. Alternatively you may have your action plan documented in electronic format or you may be using a task list. Review the action plan for each of the goals and objectives that your set to determine your progress; whether you need to focus and give more attention and time to your plan, or whether you need to revise or delete a particular action plan. Add a review note next to each action or task. I usually use a “Status” column where I add the words: Completed, On target, On hold, Needs revision, Delete task or New task. If a task or action needs to be revised then I document the necessary changes. Most of my revisions relate to the due date for the task or action, particularly for goals that were over ambitious, which is common amongst high achievers.

If you have missed certain opportunities then you should ask yourself, “What could I have done differently to capitalise on the missed opportunities that would have added value to my personal and professional life?”, and document potential changes and actions for the future. This could include learnings such as:

  • Focus on the specific goal or action,
  • Allocate more time to a particular goal,
  • Take action – “Just Do It”,
  • Invest more time to personal development instead of wasting time on non-value activities, and
  • Seek assistance from mentors, peers or role models

I also review my journal entries that I have recorded, particularly the ideas and information I have captured over the last six months. The ideas and information can be quite valuable for further reflection and implementation. Who knows; one of your ideas might be the next “blockbuster” product, service or business opportunity! The recent review of my journal entries identified thirteen new business opportunities that I have extracted and recorded separately. I am now in the process of developing individual goals and action plans for each of the business opportunities. Many of the action plans will concentrate on undertaking further research followed by conducting a feasibility for the business opportunity, while other action plans will be in the form of implementation plans.

As I have stated previously “The rest of your life starts now!”, therefore focus on your future goals and plans, and don’t spend time regretting the missed opportunities of the past.

What does your revised personal development plan or life plan look like?

Good luck and I wish you every success for the remainder of 2010!

Dr John Kapeleris

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Most people don’t have any idea on how to achieve success. Our education system does not cover the basic principles of success or personal development.  It assumes that these skills will be learned through on the job training. If you were fortunate enough to have had a mentor or have read books on success or enrolled in personal development courses then you would not have been exposed to the basic principles of success. While undertaking the “Maximize Your Performance” course through the Brian Tracy University I came across a very simple approach to maintaining self discipline and achieving success. Brian Tracy uses the acronym “GREAT” to describe five elements to achieving success:

  • Goal – orientation
  • Result – orientation
  • Excellence – orientation
  • Action – orientation
  • Time – orientation

Further details of each element are outlined below:

Goal orientation

  1. Decide what you want – Identify your major definite purpose (an organizing or major goal)
  2. Write it down
  3. Set a deadline – Setting a deadline programs your goal into your subconscious mind.
  4. Make a plan – Place a foundation under your goal
  5. Get Busy – Do something every day towards achieving your goals. Develop a sense of momentum. The difference between successful people and unsuccessful people is what they do, not what they say.

Result Orientation

  1. Identify key result areas – Outcomes you wish to accomplish
  2. Determine standards of performance, for example excellence, professional, customer oriented, high quality
  3. Focus on the highest value tasks
  4. 80/20 Rule – What are the 20% of things that I need to do that account for 80% of my results?
  • Make a list of all the things or activities you need to do and circle only the 2-3 things that are the most important
  • Discipline yourself to do the 2-3 things that are important

Excellence Orientation (be the best)

  1. Identify critical success factors
  • Generally 5-7 critical success factors for each job
  • For examples a sales role will require the following critical success factors: Prospecting, Presenting, Accessing referrals, Closing, Managing time, Building relationships

      2.   Core competencies – Special skills you bring to the market place

  • Top 10% – What is required of you to be in the top ten percent?
  • What one skill, if you developed it to an excellent level, would have the greatest single positive impact on your life?

Action Orientation (# 1 Quality of Success)

  1. Move fast on opportunities, problems and ideas
  2. Develop a sense of urgency (Do it now!)
  3. Fast tempo is absolutely essential to success
  4. Launch – Take action immediately
  • Willing to launch and take action to move forward without guarantees

      5.   Act as if it were impossible to fail.

Time Orientation

  1. Plan your work and work your plan
  • Spend time up front to plan (saves you significant time down the track)

      2.    Make a list

  • Working off a list saves 25% of time.

      3.    Set priorities on your list

  • Use the following guide plan:

         A – must do

         B – should do

         C – nice to do

         D – delegate

         E – eliminate  

      4.   Concentrate single-mindedly on your highest value task

      5.   Stay with it until it is 100% complete

Make it a great day, every day!

Dr John Kapeleris

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More on Goal Setting

January 19th, 2010 | Posted by John Kapeleris in Goals and Objectives - (5 Comments)

Goal setting is a key antecedent to success. Many of the successful people that I have worked with are strongly goal-oriented. They spend time articulating clear and specific goals, they write these goals down in detail, they work on their goals daily and review their goals periodically. Successful people also have clear, specific and written organised plans of action.

Your goals should contribute towards achieving your “Major Life Purpose” and related core values in life. What is your major purpose in life?

For goals to be affective they must be SMART Goals. That is:

  • Specific – don’t be vague
  • Measurable – quantify your goal
  • Attainable – be honest with yourself
  • Realistic – real and practical
  • Time-based – associate a timeframe

 

Although your goals should be attainable it is also important to include a few stretch goals that have the ability to take you out of your comfort zone.

The template that I use for goal setting is outlined below:

Step 1 Brainstorm all your goals and objectives

  • Take a sheet of paper or use a journal and list all your goals and objectives. They could also include your dreams and desires in life.
  • Some people have suggested you list 100 goals for this step, but if you can’t get to 100 don’t worry
  • Once you have your list then prioritize and label each as follows: 1 = goals to be achieved in one year or less, 3 = goals that are two to three years out, 5 = goals that will take about five years to achieve, and 10 = your ten year goals and dreams.

 

Step 2 Focus on your One Year goals

  • Ensure your goals satisfy the SMART criteria and rewrite if required. For example, your goal may be to “lose weight”, however this does not satisfy all the SMART criteria as it is written. The goal should be written as – “Lose 5kg by 30 Jun 2010 through 30 min of exercise at least 4 days per week, coupled with a healthy eating diet”.
  • Group your goals under the following categories:
    • Financial/Material Goals
    • Business/Career Goals
    • Personal Relationship/Social Goals
    • Health & Recreational Goals
    • Personal Development & Growth Goals
  • Further prioritize your goals under each category. I usually have 4 – 5 goals for each category and I prioritize further by asking what are the more important goals that will have the biggest impact in my life

 

Step 3 Develop Action Plans for each goal

  • Write each goal at the top of a fresh page and develop the details of your plan.
  • Break down the plan into workable individual tasks. Assign a completion date for each task.
  • Some goals may require the assistance of other people. You will need to assign specific tasks to the individual people identified who can assist you with your plan.

 

Step 4 Repeat Steps 2 and 3 above for your 3, 5 and 10 year goals

  • Some of your longer term goals may be dreams or desires. You will need to convert these dreams and desires into specific and defined individual goals with timeframes. The individual goals together with their specific tasks and actions, collectively will achieve your overall dreams.
  • Long term goals require periodic review to ensure you are on track to achieving the outcomes that you have documented in your plan.
  • You may need to revise your plans if you discover that you are not progressing as originally planned.

 

Step 5 Take Action

  • You now have the winning combination of a goal with a plan.
  • Take action immediately with the highest priority goals.
  • Self-discipline and commitment will be needed to work on your goals and plans every day. Do something every day, no matter how small, to move towards achieving your goals.
  • Document your progress in a journal or diary and make any adjustments, if required.
  • Celebrate your success and achievements by rewarding yourself.

 

Enjoy!

Dr John Kapeleris

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Happy 2010!

January 3rd, 2010 | Posted by John Kapeleris in Goals and Objectives - (3 Comments)

A new year has dawned once again!

I find that this is the time for the major review of my goals and objectives that I set for the previous year, and to document the new goals and objectives for 2010. I challenge you to do the same. Begin by identifying the major achievements and highlights for 2009. These could include work achievements, financial objectives, family highlights, personal development, educational achievements or personal success outcomes.

I use a visual journal with white pages to document my goals and objectives at the start of the year. Once I complete this activity I then develop Action Plans for the major goals and objectives. Throughout the year I periodically review my goals and revise any action plans that are not progressing as expected.

Like most people I also identify a few missed opportunities or disappointments for the year. This allows me to learn from the experience so that I can strengthen my future plans moving forward. Go ahead and document the missed opportunities and disappointments. Ask yourself, “What could I have done differently to capitalise on the missed opportunities or overcame the disappointments?”, and document potential changes and actions for the future. Don’t spend too much time regretting the missed opportunities. The rest of your life starts now, therefore focus on your future goals and plans for 2010. Some of these goals could also be carried over from 2009. Particularly goals that were over ambitious, which is common amongst high achievers.

One of the significant goals that I set revolves around my personal development program. Brian Tracy states in many of his programs that you should work on yourself more than you work on your job. By working on yourself you will always be improving your skills and knowledge, that will ultimately improve your job outcomes. Therefore, I document my personal development plan that is aligned with my goals and objectives for the year. That is, what do I need to develop to achieve the outcomes I desire? My personal development plan generally includes a reading list, personal development CDs and DVDs, a few home study courses, a target list of seminars and networking events, and a couple of online courses.

What does your personal development plan look like?

Good luck and I wish you every success for 2010!

Dr John Kapeleris

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